THE ART OF GABRIEL PICART

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"In recent years, it had been fashionable for art critics to couple the word 'mere' with 'Illustration' in diminishing pictures that tell any kind of story. And, since illustration is usually commissioned, it has also viewed as impure, commercial art when contrasted with the nobler motivation of the fine arts in which the artist is free to express his innermost feelings. This distinction, in applied consistently, would reject a Fra Angelico, a Giotto or a Michelangelo, who made paintings of Biblical subjects on a commission from wealthy patrons to the Church. To come closer to the present, many American painters such as Winslow Homer, William Glakens or Frederic Remington, whose works now command honored places in our museums, contributed much of their life's output to illustration. Certainly for them it was a valid form of art, and they gave the best to it. Most appropriate, to me, would be a distinction between good artists and bad artists."

Albert Dorne (1904-1965)

"The Illustrator in America 1880-1980, A Century of Illustration", by Walt & Roger Reed, 'The Society of Illustrators'.

(period 1980-96)

Picart began a successful art career at the early age of eighteen when he started working as an illustrator throughout Europe, mainly for Germany, Holland and the Scandinavian countries. In 1985, Picart began his collaboration with a commercial art agency from New York, starting to develop a successful career in the American market. Picart won assignments from the major publishing houses in the US and Canada, such as Reader’s Digest, Bantam Books, Dell Publishing, Harlequin, Pocket Books, Scholastic, among others, doing book covers, promotional advertising, brochures and interior illustrations, all in a representational mode with a fine art treatment. He worked as well for advertising agencies, graphic design firms and catalogue houses. Since 1996, he no longer makes illustration commissions; he paints full time. Gabriel Picart signed his illustration works 'Gabriel'.

"Friend Monkey"(1986) Dell Publishing. Oil on canvas, 18 x 18 in / 46 x 46 cm.

First commissioned cover ever for the US market. Author Pamela Lyndon Travers her own, popularly remembered for her sequence of novels about Mary Poppins, sent Picart a bunch of pictures to be used as reference for the monkey character.

"The Door in the Wall"(detail, 1990) Dell Publishing. Oil on canvas, 24 x 32 in / 61 x 81 cm.

"Unusually beautiful illustrations, full of authentic detail…" the New York Times' review on "The Door in the Wall".

"Alison of Arabia"(1996) Magic Attic Press. Oil on panel, 27 x 20 in / 68 x 51 cm.

"Storming"(detail) Historical Illustration for a 'Reader's Digest' brochure. Oil on canvas.

"Jeroboam / Who's Who in the Bible"(1994). Reader’s Digest. Oil on canvas, 30 x 21 in / 76,2 x 53 cm.

"The Problems Grow". Oil on canvas,  39.3 x 25 in / 100 x 63,5 cm.

 "Adventures Inc."(detail) Tarcher. Oil on canvas, 36.2 x 22 in / 92 x 53 cm.

"Thirsty Friend"(1996) Oil on panel.

"Venetian Carnival" (2006)*. Oil on panel,  36" x 27" / 91,5 x 68,5 cm.

* "Same way as Illustration Art does, Genre Paintings tell us a story. This is why I have added some of them on this page devoted to my past commercial work. They are also good samples of what a narrative work of mine is, but closer to the present time than my old illustrations." — GP

INDEX FINE ART GALLERY FIGURE I FIGURE II URBAN LANDSCAPE STILL LIFE CLOSE-UPS ILLUSTRATION ART BIOGRAPHY PHILOSOPHY SHOP ARCHIVE LINKS HOW I MAKE A PAINTING CONTACT BACK TO TOP

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Gabriel Picart© 2013. All rights reserved.